2013 in review

This past year saw another significant increase in page hits, which is cool in some respect. However I value interaction more, and comments are few and far between. Still people seem to care mainly about music and bluetooth headphones. The great thing is, BT headsets are now in the realm of “very affordable.”

FYI, the prior post generated a few “corrections” as to the song title of Squeeze’s “Another Nail For My Heart.” After a short discussion, and seeing both versions in print, with most favoring the one I thought to be inaccurate, I decided to write the songwriter to ask because it was starting to bother me. After listening to that song for a good 3 decades, I was convinced it was a mistake someone made, who was not familiar with the song. The lyrics said different, while the old saying says something else. It would have been natural for someone, early on, to favor the familiar saying, instead of the more subtle lyric. I alway interpreted it as if the “nail” was either a love song or a drink, or both. Here is a guy heartbroken over a breakup, drinking his sorrows, while the piano player sings  songs, each love song, another nail for the writer’s heart. This is conjecture, unless the songwriter weighs in, but it is my interpretation of it.

I figure, you can strive to be right or you can strive to be accurate. Favoring the former will mean less of the latter, whereas striving for accuracy will often net you being right more often. I was well prepared to be wrong, learn yet another small thing and wait a week while whomever intercepted the message, hopefully passed it on. To my surprise, about 5 minutes later, the songwriter, Chris Difford, answered, and wrote back:

Thanks for the email, it is indeed – for my heart…..

its been many years and it has chopped around on set lists, but from the original this is the real title

many thanks.


That, in and of itself was pretty damn cool. Sometimes I love the Internet, and being able to reach out and ask someone whose songs you have been listening to for over 30 years a question and get a fast as light answer, definitely falls within the realm of cool. By the way, I will leave readers with my summary, and a new axiom:

You can strive to be right, or you can strive to be accurate, but trying to be accurate instead of being right will get you both more often.

Someone probably already said this. If not, this one is mine. That, and I appreciate people who actually take the time to look things up — unfortunately, in the above case, the info is mostly wrong. Thanks for reading.

Continue reading


Bluetooth A2DP Receivers & Review: Kanex AirBlue

Bluetooth’s Strangled Promise

When Bluetooth was first introduced, it promised a world of wireless freedom. We, the computing public, were told  that Bluetooth would be in everything and replace USB and other connections for low-speed data transfers and other light bandwidth demands. RS 232 connections would fade—replaced by fast, flexible BT connections. Home users would benefit from wireless printing, fast connections and more freedom.

But the computing and  mobile phone public has been slow to adopt the technology thanks to the high prices compared to wired equivalents and the added complexity of pairing and connecting devices. Many people have mobile phones but only a small fraction is technically competent enough to pair and use bluetooth. Thus, high prices are as much a reflection of the niche demand as they are device manufacturers pricing devices based on perceived value of the technology. The devices themselves cost little to manufacture, but a lot to develop the software and hardware. This price premium for an “unproven killer technology” has resulted in strangling adoption rates. Who wants to pay $200 for a stereo headset or $99 for a mono-earpiece that delivers unknown benefits when a wired headsets costs only $20? Luckily, the standard has marched on to version 4.0, which offers higher throughput and lower power consumption. Finally, Bluetooth 2.0 A2DP & HFP device prices are coming down to a level that is more in line with the basic functionality of what they do.

Pairing has also been made simpler, in hopes that people will actually use that little “B” instead of bluetooth circuits — which are usually on by default — eating up battery life, and exposing a person to snooping and bluejacking.

I myself, knew the benefits or going wireless decades ago when I got an Amateur Radio License, long before mobile phones went digital. I was just waiting for the prices to come down to a point where I could justify ridding myself of wires. That point finally arrived about 2 years ago, when I found a bluetooth earpiece for less than $70.

Continue reading