Another Apple Router Bites the Dust…kinda

Last year my Airport Express (v1) was made obsolete by apple deciding to drop support for configuring it from 10.9. This year an Apple Extreme (802.11n Dual-band) that was in service for about 4–5 years finally started failing thanks to either age or heat problems. The heat issue is often important to some tech people because the amount of equipment in use easily spikes the temperature in our rooms 5°–10° or in the closets we have to stick them in. Not everyone thinks a mess of wires (properly tied or not) is a thing of beauty, so often we have to put them in closets and in spaces with little ventilation. This leads to heat building up and soon DSL modems and their UPSes and WiFi routers are dying. WiFi routers can last a long time if treated well, but if they are used constantly and under heavy loads with bad cooling, don’t expect them to last more than 5 years. As for the Airport Extreme, I am taking it to a less demanding/harsh environment. Hopefully, the lighter load will mean at least a few more years of service out of it.

As an aside: I once made the case for proper cooling in a new building when asked by the CFO if we needed Air conditioning. I said we don’t need it, but some of our equipment would burn out/malfunction 1–2 years faster costing at least a few K per year in increased maintenance and secondary costs (downtime, multiple backups, etc.)— maybe more.

I mentioned it to a friend and he said he was concerned with the iPhone 6 series’ ambient temperature ceiling (95° F). Another friend pointed out that that’s because Li-Ion batteries have this restriction, which neither of us was aware of. Checking our 5s specs, the temperature limits is also 95°F, which is interesting because the 5ses didn’t seem to have any problems in Nevada last month. So, maybe the phones Li-Ion batteries will die faster. No problem: I have replaced a few iPhone batteries and parts.

Interestingly enough, I looked and fewer and fewer manufacturers are putting this info in their specs sheets, leading me to believe some of support costs could be avoided by placing this info in the specs and making sure customers are aware of it. I know plenty of people that leave electronics with Li-Ion batteries in their cars (hidden of course). Luckily, non-operating ambient temperature ceiling are above 110°F.

Anyway, heat plays an important role in the lifespan of many electronics, and it occurred to me that few people even mention it. So, I am mentioning: If you are on a 3-year replacement cycle, paying attention to this fact isn’t too important. But if you are in the miserly camp of stretching your dollar by upgrading devices less than 3 times a decade, you might want to be aware of heat and operating temperature limits as a consideration.

Selling SoHo Printers: “It’s Airprint, Stupid”

Finding a current table of color laser Airprint capable multi-function printers (MFP) with prices and features is impossible. [If you are an Android user, just replace every reference of “Airprint” to “Cloud Print” since it is essentially a copy of Airprint, and would help Android users to find printers too] So, gathering info quickly to recommend a printer is laboriously slow at best. Adding Airprint capabilities to product page table lists and being able to filter by it (as “wireless” and “color” are valid filters on most company and shopping sites) would speed up information gathering. I only found out about Airprint coming to Xerox when I visited MacWorld Expo and asking a Xerox engineer. Worse, is this info has dropped Airprint off of HP’s list pages — but is at least still buried in each printer’s page in fine print.

When I spoke to the Xerox engineer he said some Color MFP under $1000 (for SoHo) and all Enterprise models had (or would have) Airprint, but looking at the official list today there was nothing to compete with HP’s $400 retail (~$300 street price) Color LaserJet M175nw MFP [now replaced by the M177fw] which offers Wireless print through Airprint — thus iOS devices can print without loading any software (and scan with software). Also, Canon had imageCLASS MF8580Cdw, at $600 coming out. At the show the Xerox rep, pointed out several sub-$600 Xeroxes that either had the feature or would get it with a firmware update. But since then, I have forgotten which ones those were. So, when someone shot me a quick email “Hey, saw that printer ____ and they told me to ask you about it. Which models would you recommend?” I looked it up, which led me to the first line of this post.

Airprint means that visitors do not have to go through an arduous process to print documents. No one has to call tech support, anyone with an iOS device can print simply by…

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NoiseHush NS400: A Bluetooth Stereo Headset Review

TL;DR: These Rock. sound great, work well… 5 Stars

TL;DR: These Rock. sound great, work well… 5 Stars

A while back I wrote a review of the Kanex AirBlue, and gave it the thumbs up for its sound quality and easy of use. As I mentioned I was burned by Best Buy’s in-house Rocketfish Bluetooth headset, and didn’t want to spend north of $60 for another headset that ended up in the junk drawer. Well, I always keep an eye out for products, new or old that fit the bill: I wanted an (1) easy to connect Bluetooth Headset that had (2) good stereo audio quality for music and a (3) a mic for phone calls where (4) people could hear me clearly on the other end. The Rocketfish only fit the second and third criteria, and I had been using the AirBlue since the Rocketfish broke after 3 or 4 months.

I saw the NoiseHush NS 400 on sale at NewEgg for $35 — well under my $50 limit for a BT headset — about a month and a half ago. I don’t think I should have to pay much more for wireless headset than a tethered headset of the same audio quality. So, given I think decent quality can be found for around $25, if I add the battery, buttons and bluetooth transceiver, it should be less than $45. In case you are wondering, the NoiseHush NS400 meets or exceeds my criteria for what a bluetooth headset should be.

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Always Room for Improvement…

Well 2013 is here and either we are just the holographic debris on an event horizon of a black hole, or reality is relative. I wouldn’t have minded being the Mayan Calendar maker who made the last calendar, because then when finished, and asked …

King: “What happens when we reach the end of thew calendar? This think will not work after that.”

Mayan Calendar Maker: “By then I hope we are using a better system.”

King:“But you said your system was great?”

Mayan Calendar Maker: “There is always room for improvement.”

With that said, (as I actually said when someone asked me about databases I created in the mid 1990s about Mac OS’s Unix calendar running out in 2038) I wanted to write about a few things, but a project has been eating time like the Cookie Monster with a box of chocolate chip cookies. (Cookie & Count were always my favorite.)

So, I will mash up a few things, left and right… Read of to find out about a new Bluetooth audio headset, a product warning, and whatever else comes out in this unedited memory dump:

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Apple Support: It Gets Better

A few months ago, one of the feet on my laptop fell off. I called Apple hoping they could send out a replacement, but AppleCare personnel insisted the foot was attached at the factory, and I couldn’t do my own repair. So, after a few calls, insisting that I have been disassembling laptops for over a decade, I relented and took my machine in for a bottom case swap. At that time there were no other problems with the laptop. When I got the machine back, the next time I used the optical drive, it no longer worked. I had to take it in again and have that swapped.

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Professional Typography & Design: The Path to Technomancy, Part 3

After I was hired to be a DTP monkey, I applied and refined my wild layouts, but had to tone them down quite a bit for business documents. (Wired back then was tame compared to my unrefined layout.) Being a bit of a perfectionist that cares about anything I do—whether paid or not—I started studying proper typography: I learned the difference between the hyphen, N-dash and M-dash, what x-height was and how to match serif and non-serif fonts. I studied the art of graphic design, the concepts and research behind the guidelines so I knew when I could break the rules and get away with it. I found traditional reports stuffy and boring. So, when I got the chance, I started refreshing the look of the company documents.

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