Another Apple Router Bites the Dust…kinda

Last year my Airport Express (v1) was made obsolete by apple deciding to drop support for configuring it from 10.9. This year an Apple Extreme (802.11n Dual-band) that was in service for about 4–5 years finally started failing thanks to either age or heat problems. The heat issue is often important to some tech people because the amount of equipment in use easily spikes the temperature in our rooms 5°–10° or in the closets we have to stick them in. Not everyone thinks a mess of wires (properly tied or not) is a thing of beauty, so often we have to put them in closets and in spaces with little ventilation. This leads to heat building up and soon DSL modems and their UPSes and WiFi routers are dying. WiFi routers can last a long time if treated well, but if they are used constantly and under heavy loads with bad cooling, don’t expect them to last more than 5 years. As for the Airport Extreme, I am taking it to a less demanding/harsh environment. Hopefully, the lighter load will mean at least a few more years of service out of it.

As an aside: I once made the case for proper cooling in a new building when asked by the CFO if we needed Air conditioning. I said we don’t need it, but some of our equipment would burn out/malfunction 1–2 years faster costing at least a few K per year in increased maintenance and secondary costs (downtime, multiple backups, etc.)— maybe more.

I mentioned it to a friend and he said he was concerned with the iPhone 6 series’ ambient temperature ceiling (95° F). Another friend pointed out that that’s because Li-Ion batteries have this restriction, which neither of us was aware of. Checking our 5s specs, the temperature limits is also 95°F, which is interesting because the 5ses didn’t seem to have any problems in Nevada last month. So, maybe the phones Li-Ion batteries will die faster. No problem: I have replaced a few iPhone batteries and parts.

Interestingly enough, I looked and fewer and fewer manufacturers are putting this info in their specs sheets, leading me to believe some of support costs could be avoided by placing this info in the specs and making sure customers are aware of it. I know plenty of people that leave electronics with Li-Ion batteries in their cars (hidden of course). Luckily, non-operating ambient temperature ceiling are above 110°F.

Anyway, heat plays an important role in the lifespan of many electronics, and it occurred to me that few people even mention it. So, I am mentioning: If you are on a 3-year replacement cycle, paying attention to this fact isn’t too important. But if you are in the miserly camp of stretching your dollar by upgrading devices less than 3 times a decade, you might want to be aware of heat and operating temperature limits as a consideration.

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